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Hitech Solutions places US$600,000 order for Redflow batteries

Redflow has secured its second US$600,000 order from Hitech Solutions for its batteries.  Pictured is Redflow CEO, tech entrepreneur Simon Hackett. Image: Redflow.

Australian battery company Redflow Limited has repeated its largest-ever sale of its ZBM2 zinc-bromine flow batteries after receiving an international order worth about US$600,000.

Auckland-based Hitech Solutions placed the order for a major, multi-stage project that is utilising Redflow’s ZBM2 batteries to build advanced hybrid energy storage systems that will deliver renewable energy to multiple remote sites in New Zealand.

Redflow has already completed delivery of all batteries to fulfil Hitech’s first order, which was announced in May.

Redflow CEO Simon Hackett noted: “We are delighted that Hitech has again chosen Redflow batteries. This second major sale confirms the unique advantages of our zinc-bromine flow batteries for this high-workload deployment in the tropics. The ZBM2 excels in hot environments and for applications that require high cycle depth and cycle frequency, such as the deployment Hitech is undertaking.

"This sort of environment and use case wears out lead-acid batteries in relatively short order, requiring their frequent replacement, whereas ZBM2s thrive on heat and hard work. We look forward to working with Hitech to ensure its imminent deployments of remote energy systems are successful in a variety of site sizes.”

Redflow’s 10 kilowatt hour (kWh) ZBM2, the world’s smallest zinc-bromine flow battery, is qualified to replace lead-acid batteries in remote site areas, such as telecommunication sites. The ZBM2 battery comes with a 10-year or 36,500 kWh warranty.

Redflow has been busy over the last few months, as the company announced in August that it established a company in Thailand to manage its batteries in southeast Asia. The company, Redflow (Thailand) Limited, is part of Redflow’s decision to move its battery manufacturing units from North America to Asia to be closer to its most popular markets — located in Australia, Oceania and southern Africa.