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Mercedes-Benz supplying second-life batteries for Moment Energy’s ESS solution

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Mercedes-Benz is supplying second-life batteries for Canadian startup Moment Energy’s energy storage solution (ESS), the automotive player’s second such deal in three months.

The company, through its ESS-focused Mercedes-Benz Energy subsidiary, has partnered with British Columbia-based Moment Energy to supply used batteries for the latter’s 60kWh ESS unit.

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Moment Energy, which describes itself as a second-life ESS provider, has already integrated the batteries into the unit which has a power rating of 40-320kVA. The batteries are nickel-manganese-cobalt (NMC) lithium-ion, according to Moment Energy’s technical specifications page.

It will deploy two of the systems at God’s Pocket Resort, an off-grid diesel-dependent scuba diving resort, later this year.

“Together with Moment Energy we will enable sustainable ESS-solutions for North America based on second-life batteries. We are to combine Mercedes-Benz Energy’s experience with Moment Energy’s pioneering spirit in these exciting times,” said Gordon Gassmann, CEO of Mercedes-Benz Energy.

It is Mercedes-Benz Energy’s third similar announcement in a few months. In March, it signed deal with Norway-based startup Evyon to supply 26MWh of EV battery modules in 2022. The month before that, it tied up with Swedish startup BatteryLoop, in a move that marked the company’s return to the ESS market after a quiet few years.

In a press release, Moment Energy said that second-life batteries typically still have 80% of their capacity when they are removed from EVs. The CEO of UK peer Connected Energy, whom Energy-Storage.news recently interviewed, says that at 75% capacity batteries still have a 10-year lifetime in stationary energy storage.

Moment Energy raised US$3.5 million in seed funding in November last year from lead investor Version One Ventures, along with Fika Ventures, Garage Capital and MCJ Collective.

Its tie-up with Mercedes-Benz Energy comes quickly after another automotive giant, Nissan, partnered with several Tennessee-based organisations to build two BESS projects using second life batteries at its headquarters in the city of Franklin.

Read more articles from Energy-Storage.news about second life energy storage applications here.

This article was updated after publication to include information about the deal with Evyon.

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